This and that from re Thai r ment, by 3Th. November 5, 2010

Today’s factoid:

According to Wikipedia there are over 1300 separate religions and denominations in the world today of which almost 500 are Christian. Almost every one of these religions believe that they are the one true faith ordained by God. They each also support a number of individuals whose livelihood depends upon them persuading the rest of the members of the faith that is so.

Papa Joe’s news of the day:

In Australia an NGO created to combat discrimination in employment of Aborigines, rejected the job application of an Aborigine woman because her skin was not dark enough.

Petrillo’s dyspeptic guide for the unwary traveller in Thailand:

Dangerous and costly places for the tourist in Thailand:

Just about anywhere you really, really want to go.
Pookie’s continuing adventures in Thailand:

AT THE PHARMACY

English: Songthaew on Jomtien Beach Road, Patt...

English: Songthaew on Jomtien Beach Road, Pattaya, Thailand (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When last we saw Pookie he was sitting on a curb on a busy street in Jomtien Beach hunched over vomiting uncontrollably waiting and hoping to die. Passers by stopped to offer assistance. A few asked if he was drunk or hung over and two asked if he wanted them to call an ambulance. Pookie was unable to raise his head and reply to any of them and so after a while they went on their way.

The pharmacist, a short balding man with a long pony tail and a Fu Manchu mustache began to care for him. First by providing some water and tissue and wiping the puke and mucus from Pookie’s face until he was able to do it himself and by trying to sooth him by explaining that he was probably suffering an attack food poisoning and he had some medicine that should help. Then he got Pookie to swallow a tablespoon of thick milky liquid that seemed to slow the vomiting. Finally, Pookie was able to force down some pills the pharmacist provided.

Pookie had no idea how long he crouched there unable to move, but eventually the vomiting stopped and still later he found that he could move his body a bit.

He raised himself up using his walking stick and stumbled into the pharmacy where he sat on a chair buried his head in his arms and rested on a table for quite some time. Maybe he dozed off.

After a while he felt a little better, instead of wishing for the release of death, he obsessed on the need to be home lying in his bed.

He raised his head.The pharmacist came over and patiently explained  administration of the medicines that he had assembled to treat the poisoning.

He called a moped driver to take Pookie back to the condo. Pookie got on the back convinced that he would become dizzy and fall off the back of the vehicle into traffic or even worse that he would vomit on top of the drivers head. Neither occurred and he got back to his apartment, fell strait-away into bed and slept until the following morning waking only to take his medicines.

Mopey Joe’s memories:

A CASE OF THE JOES

Giuseppe, (often shortened to Pepe or Pepino), translates from the Italian to the English as Joseph. Joe or Joey are the English nick names usually associated with Joseph. There were a lot of Joes in my family. There was Joe, Big Joe and Little Joe, Uncle Joe, Joe the Minister and Joey. I was Joey.

19th century map of Southern Italy, featuring ...

19th century map of Southern Italy, featuring the Kingdom of Two Sicilies and the islands of Sardinia and Malta. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In the Southern Italian tradition one named the first son after the paternal grandfather hence my name, Joe. The second son was named after the father. My father’s name was Giacomo, James in English although for most of his life he was called Jack or Blackie. My brother’s name of course is James. My grandfathers younger brother’s name was also James. My uncle’s name, the second born of my grandfather was Joe.The maternal grandfather only got the second name of the first-born son. My middle name is Eugene. That is the name of my mother’s father. Maybe his name was also bestowed on the third son. I do not know, I only have one brother.

How they name female children in Southern Italy I do not know either. Probably they name the eldest Maria. My sister is named Mary. My mothers eldest sister’s name was Maria. Her brother was named Joe (the minister). My grandfathers eldest sister was named Mary. On the other hand my fathers only sister was named Marcella. Go figure.

This could have made family gatherings even more confusing than they were. However, another Southern Italian tradition came to the rescue. Boys were given nick-names. Thankfully we used the names described above, otherwise I could have been named “Joe the Meatball” or some such like the mobsters in the movies. Girls did not have nicknames as far as I know.

This tradition, like all traditions of immigrants to the United States of America that were considered odd wes discarded by the first generation in our efforts to assimilate . Those traditions that remained were either, culinary (pizza and pasta), docile, like religious festivals, adaptable, like the supposed emotionalism of the Italian or heroic, like glorification of italian gangsters. So be it. I named my children Jason and Jessica like everyone else at the time. I doubt that they are even translatable into Italian. My relatives in Italy refer to them as Yason and Yessica.

Pepe’s potpourri:

1. The wisdom of Miracle Max:

Miracle Max: Sonny, true love is the greatest thing, in the world-except for a nice MLT – mutton, lettuce and tomato sandwich, where the mutton is nice and lean and the tomato is ripe
The Princess Bride.

2. Today’s album cover:

(Your guess is as good as mine.)

Today’s quote:

“Men have imagined republics and principalities that never really existed at all. Yet the way men live is so far removed from the way they ought to live that anyone who abandons what is, for what should be pursues his downfall rather than his preservation; for a man who strives after goodness in all his acts is sure to come to ruin, since there are so many men who are not good.”
Niccolo Machiavelli,“Discourses on the First Ten Books of Titus Livius”

Italiano: Copertina originale della prima stam...

Italiano: Copertina originale della prima stampa del testo di Nicolo Machiavelli (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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Categories: October through December 2010 | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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